By Cameron Buford, whatsgoodinsports.com

A week after the Los Angeles Chargers introduced their new Head Coach Brandon Staley. He got right to work to put together his coaching staff. During Coach Staley’s introductory press conference he was asked about the lack of minority coaches in the league and vowed that giving guys an opportunity was important to him. He proved to be a man of his word, in this regard, by announcing that 2 of his 3 coordinators would be minority coaches. This article will give you a glimpse of each of the guys he’s hired as Coordinators for this new look Los Angeles Chargers. 

In football circles the mere mention of the name Lombardi has fans thinking championship pedigree. Well the fact Joe is actually the grandson of Hall of Fame Football Coach Vince Lombardi adds to that credence to that line of thinking for Chargers fans. As a graduate Seattle Prep High School in the Pacific Northwest, Lombardi attended the United States Air Force Academy where he was a three year letterman before graduating in 1994. 

His College coaching career had many stops, University of Dayton, VMI, Bucknell and he coach in the early iteration of the XFL for the New York/ New Jersey Hitmen before coaching at Mercyhurst. It was at Mercyhurst, that he would cross paths with a young Brandon Staley, as the Offensive Coordinator and his Quarterback Coach before becoming a coach in the NFL. Joe spent one year as a defensive assistant for the Atlanta Falcons and spent the rest of his career coaching the offensive side of the ball. 

He spent time as an Offensive Assistant for the New Orleans Saints and won a Super bowl as an Quarterbacks Coach before becoming an offensive Coordinator for the Detroit Lions. He maintained a relationship with Brandon Staley years after coaching him which has presented this opportunity for him. 

Without committing to a specific philosophy he mention something he learned to live by as an Offensive Coach, “you pass to score and run to win!” In regards to utilizing Justin Herbert’s skillset Joe says, “I think we wanted to have the ability at running our offense at different tempos and no huddle option is something Brandon discussed.” He elaborated by saying that, “I’m comfortable with whatever our guys are good at.” When asked about going for it on 4th down, he said did say that, “I’m a big fan of going for it on 4th down.” 

On the same day the Los Angeles also announced 10 year NFL Veteran Renaldo Hill as their Defensive Coordinator. This Detroit, Michigan was a four-year starting defensive back at Chadsey High School. He was also named to the school’s academic honor roll on two different occasions. Hill attended Michigan State University where he played for Nick Saban in his first couple seasons. He earned honorable mention All-Big Ten Conference and second-team All-Big Ten performer at MSU before being drafted in the seventh round in the 2001 NFL Draft. 

Reynaldo played for the Arizona Cardinals for 3 season after being drafted. He also played for the Oakland Raiders in 2005 before being reunited with Nick Saban in Miami 2006-2008. Lastly he played for the Denver Broncos where he was under the tutelage Vic Fangio for 2 seasons. 

Reynaldo showed himself to be a quality teammate and left positive vibes each place he played, so much so that he was welcomed back when his when his playing days were over. He began his coaching career with the Wyoming Cowboys as a graduate assistant in 2012 before being promoted to 

cornerback’s coach 2013. He also coach the defensive back for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2055-2017, the Miami Dolphins 2018 and his former team, the Denver Broncos. When asked what would be the trademark of his defense, Hill “The biggest thing that I mentioned earlier is giving these guys the why, the tax, and the stress. Obviously, you want to give these guys ownership. Our trademark, when we give those guys those things, we want to be able to play fast, play smart, and be able to compete for four quarters, or whatever it might take.” I then asked Hill about the pressure of being a minority coach Hill told me, “There’s always that pressure; but it’s no different than being a player and playing in a game. I figured if I prepare and study work my tail off. Be discipline, in the think that gives me the best chance for success.” 

New Los Angeles Chargers Special Team Coach Derius Swinton began his introductory press conference thanking the Spanos’, Tom Telesco, and Brandon Staley along with the Arizona Cardinals, Michael Bidwell and those that helped him get to this point. He then made a special point to thank the players that he coached humbly stating, “I wouldn’t be in this seat at this age without them, I’m not here because I’m some Guru! I’m here because the relationships I’ve had with the players and the performances they’ve put out on the field.” 

I was curious to hear him explain his keys to having quality Special Teams play, his response was unique and to the point stating, “You’re going to hear me say this over and over and you’re going to get tired of hearing it, the players are going to hear it… I stick by three things; We will talk about the three F’s of football: fast, physical, and fundamentally sound.” He did admit one of those doesn’t exactly begin with the letter F, but is “phonetically correct,” and his mom who is an English teacher, would appreciate him slipping phonetically into his press conference. 

“When I talk about being fast, it’s not everybody has to run a 4.4 [40-yard dash]. It’s maximizing whatever you do to the best of your ability and as fast as you are. If you’re a 4.7, I want you to play at a 4.7 in every single phase.” 

“Physical; it’s whatever you do, do it physically. It’s a physical sport. Guys use their tools in different ways. That doesn’t mean go and blow somebody up. This means to do it with physicality. You see a guy like [Chiefs WR] Tyreek Hill. He plays physically fast. The last thing, just fundamentally sound.” 

“You can’t do anything without fundamentals. We’re going to be based around taking every single day — and I tell the guys from the time we go from training camp in the offseason, to the last week of the Super Bowl, we’re going to be doing the same fundamentals every day, and just train those guys to use those things to fit into whatever scheme we build around them.” 

Swinton comes off as a people person, that truly cares about his players as people! Further evidence of this came when he answered my next question about relationship building. He stated that he starts his meetings at the beginning of each season telling the player that, “My job, and any other coaches’ job is to make sure, at the end of training camp, that they are employed in the NFL. Once they see that you are committed to them as people; and having them employed and providing for your families. Then that’s beyond football.” 

Swinton is a graduate of Hampton University where he played football from 2003 to 2006. Derius spent one season at the University of Tennessee as a Defensive Graduate Assistant. He then spent multiple 

coaching Special Teams in some variation for the St. Louis Rams, Kansa City Chiefs, Devnver Broncos, Chicago Bears, San Francisco 49ers Detroit, and lastly the afore mentioned Arizona Cardinals. 

Derious Swinton is as real as the place he comes from which is Newport News, VA. To make out of this tough place, it requires the toughness and focus he displayed in his press conference. If the team plays like anything close to his message the Chargers will have a much-improved Special Teams unit! 

Each of these new Coordinators the Chargers introduced, match the emphasis Brandon Staley discussed last week, “Relationships and Competition.” We won’t know how things playout for them, until the players and coaches get on the grass and start working out. But one thing is for sure, these players and coached will become a close knot family, and when they finally take the field on gameday they will be closer than ever playing for each other which should make for and improved record and more productivity. 

Kindly share your thoughts on what stood out to you about either of these coaches and how you see the team me by reaching out to me on Twitter @whatsgoodnsport. Or forward any suggestions on what topics or angles you would like to see discussed to info@whatsgoodinsports.com. 

Lastly, be sure to subscribe to our weekly “Voice of the Fans Podcast”, which is available for you on most podcasting platforms; Apple and Google Podcasts, including Spotify, TuneIn, and iHeart Radio, to name a few. On our Podcast, we have passionate banter about various NFL storylines while addressing the multitude of NBA topics! 

A week after the Los Angeles Chargers introduced their new Head Coach Brandon Staley. He got right to work to put together his coaching staff. During Coach Staley’s introductory press conference he was asked about the lack of minority coaches in the league and vowed that giving guys an opportunity was important to him. He proved to be a man of his word, in this regard, by announcing that 2 of his 3 coordinators would be minority coaches. This article will give you a glimpse of each of the guys he’s hired as Coordinators for this new-look Los Angeles Chargers. 

In football circles the mere mention of the name Lombardi has fans thinking championship pedigree. Well, the fact Joe is the grandson of Hall of Fame Football Coach Vince Lombardi adds to that credence to that line of thinking for Chargers fans. As a graduate of Seattle Prep High School in the Pacific Northwest, Lombardi attended the United States Air Force Academy where he was a three-year letterman before graduating in 1994. 

His College coaching career had many stops, University of Dayton, VMI, Bucknell and he coached in the early iteration of the XFL for the New York/ New Jersey Hitmen before coaching at Mercyhurst. It was at Mercyhurst, that he would cross paths with a young Brandon Staley, as the Offensive Coordinator and his Quarterback Coach before becoming a coach in the NFL. Joe spent one year as a defensive assistant for the Atlanta Falcons and spent the rest of his career coaching the offensive side of the ball. 

He spent time as an Offensive Assistant for the New Orleans Saints and won a Super Bowl as a Quarterbacks Coach before becoming an offensive coordinator for the Detroit Lions. He maintained a relationship with Brandon Staley years after coaching him which has presented this opportunity for him. 

Without committing to a specific philosophy he mentions something he learned to live by as an Offensive Coach, “you pass to score and run to win!” In regards to utilizing Justin Herbert’s skillset, Joe says, “I think we wanted to have the ability at running our offense at different tempos and the no-huddle option is something Brandon discussed.” He elaborated by saying that, “I’m comfortable with whatever our guys are good at.” When asked about going for it on 4th down, he said did say that “I’m a big fan of going for it on 4th down.” 

On the same day, the Los Angeles Chargers also announced 10 year NFL Veteran Renaldo Hill as their Defensive Coordinator. This Detroit, Michigan was a four-year starting defensive back at Chadsey High School. He was also named to the school’s academic honor roll on two different occasions. Hill attended Michigan State University where he played for Nick Saban in his first couple of seasons. He earned honorable mention All-Big Ten Conference and second-team All-Big Ten performer at MSU before being drafted in the seventh round in the 2001 NFL Draft. 

Reynaldo played for the Arizona Cardinals for 3 seasons after being drafted. He also played for the Oakland Raiders in 2005 before being reunited with Nick Saban in Miami 2006-2008. Lastly, he played for the Denver Broncos where he was under the tutelage of Vic Fangio for 2 seasons. 

Reynaldo showed himself to be a quality teammate and left positive vibes each place he played, so much so that he was welcomed back when his playing days were over. He began his coaching career with the Wyoming Cowboys as a graduate assistant in 2012 before being promoted to cornerback’s coach in 2013. He also coached the defensive back for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2055-2017, the Miami Dolphins 2018, and his former team, the Denver Broncos. When asked what would be the trademark of his defense, Hill “The biggest thing that I mentioned earlier is giving these guys the why, the tax, and the stress. Obviously, you want to give these guys ownership. Our trademark, when we give those guys those things, we want to be able to play fast, play smart, and be able to compete for four quarters, or whatever it might take.” I then asked Hill about the pressure of being a minority coach Hill told me, “There’s always that pressure, but it’s no different than being a player and playing in a game. I figured if I prepare and study, work my tail off. Be discipline, in the thing that gives me the best chance for success.” 

New Los Angeles Chargers Special Team Coach Derius Swinton began his introductory press conference thanking the Spanos’, Tom Telesco, and Brandon Staley along with the Arizona Cardinals, Michael Bidwell, and those that helped him get to this point. He then made a special point to thank the players that he coached humbly stating, “I wouldn’t be in this seat at this age without them, I’m not here because I’m some Guru! I’m here because of the relationships I’ve had with the players and the performances they’ve put out on the field.” 

I was curious to hear him explain his keys to having quality Special Teams play, his response was unique and to the point stating, “You’re going to hear me say this over and over and you’re going to get tired of hearing it, the players are going to hear it… I stick by three things; We will talk about the three F’s of football: fast, physical, and fundamentally sound.” He did admit one of those doesn’t exactly begin with 

the letter F, but is “phonetically correct,” and his mom who is an English teacher, would appreciate him slipping phonetically into his press conference. 

“When I talk about being fast, it’s not everybody has to run a 4.4 [40-yard dash]. It’s maximizing whatever you do to the best of your ability and as fast as you are. If you’re a 4.7, I want you to play at a 4.7 in every single phase.” 

“Physical; it’s whatever you do, do it physically. It’s a physical sport. Guys use their tools in different ways. That doesn’t mean go and blow somebody up. This means to do it with physicality. You see a guy like [Chiefs WR] Tyreek Hill. He plays physically fast. The last thing, just fundamentally sound.” 

“You can’t do anything without fundamentals. We’re going to be based around taking every single day — and I tell the guys from the time we go from training-camp in the offseason, to the last week of the Super Bowl, we’re going to be doing the same fundamentals every day, and just train those guys to use those things to fit into whatever scheme we build around them.” 

Swinton comes off as a people person, that truly cares about his players as people! Further evidence of this came when he answered my next question about relationship building. He stated that he starts his meetings at the beginning of each season telling the player, “My job, and any other coaches’ job is to make sure, at the end of training camp, that they are employed in the NFL. Once they see that you are committed to them as people, and having them employed, and providing for your families. Then that’s beyond football.” 

Swinton is a graduate of Hampton University where he played football from 2003 to 2006. Derius spent one season at the University of Tennessee as a Defensive Graduate Assistant. He then spent multiple coaching Special Teams in some variation for the St. Louis Rams, Kansa City Chiefs, Denver Broncos, Chicago Bears, San Francisco 49ers Detroit, and lastly the aforementioned Arizona Cardinals. 

Derius Swinton is as real as the place he comes from which is Newport News, VA. To make out of this tough place in South Eastern Virginia requires the toughness and focus he displayed in his press conference. If the team plays like anything close to his message the Chargers will have a much-improved Special Teams unit! 

Each of these new Coordinators the Chargers introduced, match the emphasis Brandon Staley discussed last week, “Relationships and Competition.” We won’t know how things play out for them until the players and coaches get on the grass and start working out. But one thing is for sure, these players and coaches will become a close knot family, and when they finally take the field on game day they will be closer than ever playing for each other which should make for an improved record and more productivity. 

Kindly share your thoughts on what stood out to you about either of these coaches and how you see the team with me by reaching out to me on Twitter @whatsgoodnsport. Or forward any suggestions on what topics or angles you would like to see discussed to info@whatsgoodinsports.com. 

Lastly, be sure to subscribe to our weekly “Voice of the Fans Podcast”, which is available for you on most podcasting platforms; Apple and Google Podcasts, including Spotify, TuneIn, and iHeart Radio, to name a few. On our Podcast, we have passionate banter about various NFL storylines while addressing the multitude of NBA topics!